Author: Kyla

Separation Anxiety In Dogs

Among the most usual pet owners’ complaints is that their dogs are destructive or disruptive when left alone. Their pups might howl, chew, urinate, defecate, bark, dig, or attempt to escape. Even though these issues usually tell that a dog has to be taught polite house manners, they could likewise be anxiety and distress symptoms. When a pup’s issues are accompanied by other anxious behaviors, like excessively drooling and showing symptoms of anxiety when his owners are about to leave their home, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the dog is not house-trained or does not know which toys he could chew. Instead, they could be indications that the dog is suffering from separation anxiety. This is usually triggered when our canine friends become upset or distressed because of separation from their pet parents or the people they are attached to. Dogs with anxiety would also try to escape. These instances are often extreme and could result in self-harm and household damage, particularly around exit points such as doors and windows.

Some dogs who are suffering from separation anxiety would also try to stop their guardians from leaving the house. Oftentimes, right after the pet parent leaves a dog suffering from separation anxiety, it would begin barking incessantly and manifest other signs of anxious behaviors, usually within minutes after being left alone.

When treating a dog who is suffering from separation anxiety, the aim is to deal with his underlying anxiety by training him to enjoy, or even just tolerate, alone time at home. This is achieved by setting up scenarios to experience the instances that trigger his anxiety, specifically being left alone without experiencing anxiety or fear.

Ensure that your pet gets enough exercise every day. A happy and tired dog would be less upset when you leave. It is also recommended that you challenge your dog’s mind. Use interactive puzzles. Play fetch and training games. Work their body as well as their mind. That would keep them happy, busy, and too tired to be distressed while you are away.

Instagram Marketing

Instagram is the perfect place for both novice and professional photographers to promote their services and expand their reach to new audience. It is the only social media channel that is heavy on photography and among the most popular digital marketing platforms to date.

It is steadily growing the number of active users by seven figures and regularly adding new functionalities for visual expression. There’s no excuse for any professional photographer who wants to make a living out of their photography to not be present and active on this platform.

  1. Make Your Bio Relevant

The initial thing a user sees when viewing your Instagram profile is your bio. Because of the limited amount of characters allowed on your Instagram bio field, you need to keep this information short and concise.

Ensure you have your business name and location, a short description of the work and services you do, and a URL to your portfolio or website. This way, if a prospective client is looking for a photographer within your area, they would be able to find you quicker and more easily.

  1. Drip Feed Your Posts

For effective Instagram marketing, make sure that your Instagram feed looks coherent and polished. Curate your photos, and then plan your posts at least once a day.

Nevertheless, if you are a new photographer and you want to grow your followers quicker, post in the morning, afternoon, and evening to avoid spamming your followers’ news feeds. You want them to see what you can offer without irritating them, as your audience could be quick to click unfollow when annoyed.

  1. Add a Short Story

Write your photo captions short and concise, but always try to give them something they may be interested in, or they can relate to.

  1. Make the Most of Hashtags

Hashtags can make a huge difference when it comes to exposure and marketing on Instagram.

Use hashtags on your posts to tell the photography niche you do, where you’re based, and other pertinent information in the photo.

When making your hashtags, consider the things local prospective clients might be looking for or potential businesses that might share your work or even collaborate with you.